Creative Factors in Scientific Research: A Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis upon Imagination

Creative Factors in Scientific Research: A Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis upon Imagination

Creative Factors in Scientific Research: A Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis upon Imagination

Creative Factors in Scientific Research: A Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis upon Imagination

Excerpt

"But as life mind grew more ambitious and adventurous, situations arose when even Mind was puzzled. Then there was a check in the proceedings, some moments of PAIN the glow turned into incandescence; Mind was THINKING .

"Things were never the same after this . . . there was no forgetting that thinking experience. It was not all comfortable--at least not at first--but there was a fascination about it that Mind could not resist. It was now definitely interested in itself. "In moments of self-adoration, it would forget Nature, Life, the world outside, spellbound by the inner view.... Then visions would come to mind, phantoms. Some like things outside, and others quite different. Some of these Mind kept to itself, but others it thrust out into the world and made them live.... Thought and IMAGINATION were transforming the world, and the thinker and dreamer was MAN "

--Alexander Goldenweiser

WHEN William Fielding Ogburn made his presidential address before the American Sociological Society in midwinter of 1929, his subject was "The Folkways of a Scientific Sociology." In the course of this address he made a remarkable prediction concerning the future trends of the sociological tradition and put the full weight of his own support behind the development of these future folkways. As he outlined these trends, in part, he said:

In the future era of scientific sociology there will be a marked decline in the prestige of intellectuality as such compared with its vogue in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. But this decline in the prestige of intellectuality will be only among the scientists themselves. For the difference between scientific activities and intellectual activities will be more sharply drawn.... This does not mean, of course, that scientists may not be great intellects. Quite the contrary. Intellectual play or display may be the recreation of the future social scientist but hardly his main work.... Of course the disciplining of thought is not so apparent in one of the steps in scientific work, viz., the originating of ideas, or in the slang equivalent, "the getting of hunches." There imagination and free association are the greatest aid to the scientist. It is for this reason that . . .

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