An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy: The Therapeutic Relationship

An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy: The Therapeutic Relationship

An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy: The Therapeutic Relationship

An Introduction to Jungian Psychotherapy: The Therapeutic Relationship

Synopsis

The unique relationship between patient and therapist is the main healing factor in psychotherapy. This book explains the Jungian approach to the therapeutic relationship and the treatment process. David Sedgwick outlines a modern Jungian approach to psychotherapy. He introduces, considers and criticizes key aspects of Jungian and other theoretical perspectives, synthesizing approaches and ideas from across the therapeutic spectrum. Written in an accessible style and illustrated with numerous examples, this mediation on therapy and the therapeutic relationship will be invaluable to students and practitioners of both Jungian and non-Jungian therapy.

Excerpt

To understand Jungian psychotherapy you have to know something about Jungian theory, especially how Jungians view the unconscious. This task is difficult, however, because the full range of Jungian thought about the nature of the unconscious is a book in itself. Furthermore, it is to a certain extent the spirit of Jung’s work, rather than its particulars, that informs Jungian psychotherapy. The general task of this chapter is to provide some of the spirit and some of the particulars about the Jungian view of the unconscious psyche without explicating all of analytical psychology. The specific goal is to explore selected aspects of Jungian psychological theory relevant to the therapeutic relationship. To do so, a careful look at some points of contention in Jungian thought may occasionally become necessary.

PSYCHOTHERAPY vs ANALYSIS

“Psychotherapy” means therapy for the psyche (literal definition), and involves a concerted effort to treat mental disorders (a more psychiatric definition) or to attend to and heal emotional pain and conflicts (a more humanistic definition). In a sense, any kind of helpful treatment is psychotherapeutic—drug therapy would be a form of psychotherapy, as would religion or perhaps some regular tennis lessons. Psychotherapy as usually defined by therapists, however, also includes a specifically psychological understanding of the person in a specifically psychological treatment situation.

By these standards, psychoanalysis, which traditionally involves almost daily meetings, a couch, and a certain interpretive format, is psychotherapy. But psychoanalysis has always sought to distinguish itself from psychotherapy with regard to depth, structure, and method. Jungian

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