The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change

The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change

The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change

The Prehistory of Food: Appetites for Change

Synopsis

The Prehistory of Food sets subsistence in its social context by focusing on food as a cultural artefact. It brings together contributors with a scientific and biological expertise as well as those interested in the patterns of consumption and social change, and includes a wide range of case studies.

Excerpt

This book is based around a session at the Third World Archaeological Congress, held in New Delhi in December 1994, but it also differs from the structure of that session in a number of significant respects. First, not all of the papers given at the session have been published here. In particular, there was a group of papers by Indian contributors, which, for a variety of reasons, have not come to publication. On the other hand, the editors (aided, as ever, by Peter Ucko) have recruited new papers to attempt to ensure a good geographical coverage and consideration of a wide range of topics. In the end, consideration of different regions has been reasonably wide, although we had hoped for more papers on Africa and certainly more by African scholars. The fact that Europe has recieved little attention is unintentional, but not of concern given the general rate of publication on European topics.

The editors would jointly like to thank Mekund Kajale for the very active role he played in encouraging Indian papers given at the conference and to the actual organization of the conference session itself. Deborah Pearsall was active in recruiting American contributions for the conference, but was precluded by pressures of work from engaging in the editing of this volume. We thank David Harris for the active role he played within the original conference session. Peter Ucko has recruited some of the papers for this volume and has provided encouragement and applied pressure when needed, to both authors and editors. Chris Gosden would like to thank the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the Australian National University in Canberra where he carried out much of his editing whilst a Visiting Fellow during 1997.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.