All Change at Work? British Employment Relations 1980-1998, Portrayed by the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey Series

All Change at Work? British Employment Relations 1980-1998, Portrayed by the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey Series

All Change at Work? British Employment Relations 1980-1998, Portrayed by the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey Series

All Change at Work? British Employment Relations 1980-1998, Portrayed by the Workplace Industrial Relations Survey Series

Synopsis

All Change at Work focuses on change, captured by gathering together an enormous bank of data from four large-scale and highly respected surveys, and plotting trends from 1980 to the present. In addition, a special panel of workplaces, surveyed in both 1990 and 1998, reveals the complex process of change. Comprehensive in scope, the results are statistically reliable and reveal the nature and extent of change in all places of work except the smallest of British workplaces.

Excerpt

This book is the second volume of findings arising from the 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS98). It is appropriate that it should focus on change. WERS98 was the fourth in a series of workplace surveys, the first of which was conducted as long ago as 1980. the last two decades have seen extensive change in the economic, social and political landscape of Britain including—as this book amply demonstrates—employment relations policies and practices. But the extent of change—and the factors behind it—have been the subject of continuing debate among academics, practitioners and policy makers.

The purpose of the survey series has always been to contribute to public discussion on employment relations by providing an extensive and authoritative body of factual information on practice in British workplaces. On each successive survey this has been achieved through the publication of at least one volume by the primary research team and a plethora of journal articles and research papers by academics in Britain and abroad. the surveys have thus gained an international reputation and formed the model for similar ones in several other countries.

The design and content of the survey evolved to meet changing requirements and changing circumstances. For example, compared with the 1980 Workplace Industrial Relations Survey, WERS98 placed less emphasis on formal institutions and more emphasis on management practice. the main 1998 survey, for the first time, included workplaces with between ten and twenty-four employees. and even more of a departure was the introduction of an employee element through self-completion questionnaires passed on to randomly selected workers in the sampled workplaces.

In deciding to make these major changes to survey design and content, the wers steering committee was acutely conscious of the need to retain an element of continuity with earlier surveys. Hence the panel element to the survey was expanded considerably and given more focus than the earlier ones. a special interview schedule was used for these workplaces, retaining many questions from the 1990 survey and probing, where appropriate, for the reasons why change had taken place.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.