Colloquial Arabic (Levantine)

Colloquial Arabic (Levantine)

Colloquial Arabic (Levantine)

Colloquial Arabic (Levantine)

Synopsis

Colloquial Arabic (Levantine) Specially written by experienced teachers for self-study or class use, the course offers you a step-by-step approach to written and spoken Arabic (Levantine). No previous knowledge of the language is required.What makes Colloquial Arabic your best choice in personal language learning?* interactive - lots of dialogues and exercises for regular practice* clear - concise grammar notes* practical - useful vocabulary and pronunciation guide* complete - including answer key and special reference sectionBy the end of this rewarding course you will be able to communicate confidently and effectively in a broad range of situations.

Excerpt

Arabic is the language of daily communication for between 150 and 200 million people, and the language of worship for many hundreds more millions of Muslims. It is the original language of the Koran, which in Muslim belief is incomparably excellent, since it is the direct word of God (kalaam allaah). Arabic is the language of prayer for all Muslims, and the language of the muezzin who summons the faithful to prayer the world over five times daily. It is now an official working language in the UN and many international agencies. Its script is used in many other languages—Persian, Ottoman Turkish and Urdu among them—and since the Koran is possibly the world’s best selling book the Arabic script may well be the second most used script after Latin. The Arabic written language is almost completely uniform throughout the Arab world. Moreover the language of radio and television is uniform to the same extent, since it is simply the written word of modern Arabic being read aloud.

There is a direct line of descent from classical Arabic, the language of the Koran, to modern Arabic; so that across 1,400 years (in the Islamic calendar) the script is recognizably the same, the grammar has changed remarkably little (by comparison with, for example, German or English) and even the vocabulary has shown an astonishing integrity and consistency. It is the Koran which has preserved the essence of written Arabic, and it is also the elevated status accorded to the original language of Islam which has prevented the Arabic dialects from becoming as far apart from each other as the dialects of Latin. Whereas Italian and French are not now mutually comprehensible, the speakers of dialects of Arabic over an enormous area can understand each other. Peasants from Muscat and Morocco respectively would certainly have problems with each other’s dialects, but even peasants and certainly

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