The Americanisation of European Business: The Marshall Plan and the Transfer of Us Management Models

The Americanisation of European Business: The Marshall Plan and the Transfer of Us Management Models

The Americanisation of European Business: The Marshall Plan and the Transfer of Us Management Models

The Americanisation of European Business: The Marshall Plan and the Transfer of Us Management Models

Synopsis

This book examines the mechanisms and channels through which American managerial know-how and US management models were transferred to Europe after 1945. as well as the actual influence on European industries and regions in the 1950s and 1960s.

Excerpt

This book originated from the idea to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the Marshall Plan. This American initiative, first announced in 1947, undoubtedly shaped the subsequent evolution of Western Europe in many different ways. Our objective was to find out what influence it had on European business. We therefore invited a number of scholars who had worked intensively on this subject to Reading for a conference on ‘The Response of European Industry to the US Productivity Drive, 1948-60’, held on 13 and 14 December 1996.

We would like to express our gratitude to all who responded to our call and attended the conference. This includes not only those who presented papers, but also those who commented on these papers, namely Rolv Petter Amdam, Patrick Fridenson and Steven Tolliday. We also gratefully acknowledge the financial support for the conference received from the Department of Economics at the University of Reading, the Møre Research Centre in Molde, Norway and the British Academy. In addition, we would like to highlight the contribution of the supportive environment in which this conference took place, i.e. the Centre for International Business History (CIBH) at the University of Reading, including its Director Geoffrey Jones and the PhD students who provided indispensable logistical support. And last but not least, we would like to thank the whole Jørgensen Bjarnar family who hosted a memorable Norwegian evening, which was the concluding—and crowning—event of the conference and of the year they had spent in Reading.

For the book, we invited a number of additional contributions. Many thanks to John Dunning, David Ellwood, Henrik Glimstedt and Christian Kleinschmidt who responded to our invitation and completed their chapters under considerable time pressure. We would like to thank all the contributors for their positive response to our numerous suggestions during the editorial process and for their valiant attempts to write their chapters in the Routledge house style. Our gratitude also goes to Jonathan Zeitlin for his support and suggestions, Ann Prior who helped with the language editing of several chapters and to the Møre Research Centre and the Norwegian Research Council,

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