New Instruments for Environmental Policy in the EU

New Instruments for Environmental Policy in the EU

New Instruments for Environmental Policy in the EU

New Instruments for Environmental Policy in the EU

Synopsis

Experts from law, political science and economics provide a detailed examination of the debate over new forms of environmental regulation in the European Union, offering recommendations for improving the next generation of policies.

Excerpt

Environmental policy in many parts of the world is currently undergoing a fundamental transition, from a traditional command and control approach towards one which places greater reliance on a new arsenal of flexible and efficient policy tools. This transition has been vigorously supported by the European Commission and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), but also reflects concern within member states that command and control methods forego potential environmental improvements and impose unnecessary regulatory burdens. Thus the appeal of new instruments, such as market-based approaches and voluntary agreements, which have the potential to reduce the cost of environmental regulation while improving environmental protection.

This book grew out of a summer workshop held on these topics in July 1995 by the Robert Schuman Centre of the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, a postgraduate research institute set up by the member states of the European Union. The workshop and the subsequent completion of the book benefited from the generous financial support of DG XI in the European Commission. The book is highly interdisciplinary, and brings together experts from the fields of law, political science and economics in order to address three central questions. First, what are the conceptual and substantive implications of shifting from a traditional regulatory strategy to one which incorporates new environmental instruments? Second, how do governments, international organisations, industrial groups and environmental non-governmental organisations (NGOs) view the desirability and feasibility of such a shift? Third, what lessons can be learned from the practical experience with new instruments in the European Union in order to improve the next generation of policies?

This book seeks to contribute to the policy debate on several levels. The opening chapter introduces the central issues surrounding the utilisation of new instruments, provides a comparative overview of the subsequent chapters and highlights some of the book’s implications. Part I (Chapters 2-7) then offers a detailed analysis of the development and effectiveness of new instruments in six member states. Part II (Chapters 8-11) explores experi-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.