Advances in Organizational Justice

Advances in Organizational Justice

Advances in Organizational Justice

Advances in Organizational Justice

Synopsis

A study of state-of-the-art organisational justice, the study of people's perceptions of fairness in organisations, this book presents new theoretical positions and identifies future areas of application.

Excerpt

Walk into any office or retail establishment and start talking to the employees. Before you know it, the topic of conversation is sure to turn to fairness and justice. Questions about the fairness of pay, the rules used to schedule vacation time, and treatment by bosses are just a few of the topics likely to arise—and everyone has an opinion about them. It would be misleading to suggest, however, that concerns about fairness are unique to the rank-and-file. Indeed, matters of justice routinely consume the attention of top executives, who must attend to such concerns as the fairness of their labor policies, advertising campaigns, and corporate contributions. Indeed, at any level, it is safe to say that concerns about justice on the job are ubiquitous.

The field of organizational justice—the study of people's perceptions of fairness in organizations—is dedicated to understanding these issues. When the senior editor of this book first coined the term organizational justice in 1987, he and other scientists focused unabashedly on announcing its relevance to the world. They were on a mission to establish the legitimacy of organizational justice in the competitive marketplace of social scientific ideas. However, it is now clear that they have been successful beyond their wildest imaginations. Not only has there been an outpouring of books and journal articles about organizational justice (including many by the contributors to this book!), but there also have been several important international conferences devoted to the topic in recent years. Organizational justice as an area of study has grown so popular, in fact, that for several years, it was the most popular topic of papers submitted to the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management. Given all this attention, it is not surprising that interest in organizational justice has spread from the basic disciplines of sociology and social psychology, where much of it is rooted, to the applied fields of industrial/organizational psychology, human resources management, organizational behavior, consumer behavior, and legal studies.

Clearly, it is easy to lose oneself in this tide of scholarship—especially when one considers the highly focused, routine matters to which social scientists must devote their attentions. When confronting the routine tasks of . . .

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