From Roman Britain to Norman England

From Roman Britain to Norman England

From Roman Britain to Norman England

From Roman Britain to Norman England

Synopsis

This revised edition of the classic text of the period provides both the student and the specialist with an informative account of post-Roman English society.After a general survey of the main developments from the fourth century to the eleventh, the book offers analysis of:* social organization* the changing character of kingship, of royal government and the influence of the church* the history of settlement* the making of the landscape* the growth of towns and trade* the consequences of the Norman Conquest.The author also considers the various influences; British, Frankish, Viking and Christian that helped shape English society and contributed to the making of a united kingdom.

Excerpt

This book is an attempt to interpret early English history in the light of recent research. Like all work done on this period in the past three decades, it is based on the foundations laid by Sir Frank Stenton whose great book Anglo-Saxon England is, and will long remain, the indispensable guide for all serious students. There are, however, a number of topics on which it may be helpful to offer an alternative view, determined in part by the discoveries made since 1943 by numismatists, archaeologists, linguists and others, and in part by the insights of earlier scholars, notably H.M. Chadwick, F.W. Maitland, E.W. Robertson and by the founder of the modern study of the subject, J.M. Kemble. the present book is not a comprehensive treatment of all topics; attention is rather concentrated on those that appear to be in particular need of some revision; for others reference may be made to publications noted in the bibliography.

Many people have helped in the preparation of this book. I should like to thank Sheona Ferguson for typing it, and John Dixon and Geoffrey Hodgson for drawing the maps. I should also like to acknowledge my debt to students and colleagues in the University of Leeds and elsewhere, and to my own teachers from E.A. Greening Lam-born to Christopher Cheney. I have also gained much from the advice and criticism of Dorothy Whitelock, who has generously allowed me to use her translations of many texts. Many scholars have helped on particular points; Christopher Arnold, Pierre Chaplais, William Ford, Margaret Gelling, John Hind, Harold Mattingly, Richard Morris, William Nicolaisen and Eric Stanley. Martin Biddle, Wendy Davies, Molly Miller, David Rollason, David Wilson and Susan Youngs have all generously allowed me to see work in advance of publication. Gillian Fellows-Jensen and Janet Nelson have read parts of the book, David Dumville, Ian Wood and Patrick Wormald have read it all. They have saved me from many mistakes, and suggested many improvements. To all I should like to express my thanks.

P.H.SAWYER

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