Time

Time

Time

Time

Synopsis

Time offers a comprehensive history of the philosophy of time in western philosophy from the Greeks through to the twentieth century.In the first half of the book, Philip Turetzky explores theories in ancient and modern philosophy chronologically: from Aristotle to Nietzsche. In the latter half, Turetzky describes the philosophy of time in three twentieth-century philosophical traditions:* analytic philosophy including philosophers such as McTaggart and Mellor* phenomenology Husserl and Heidegger* a distaff tradition which Turetzky identifies as including Bergson and Deleuze.

Excerpt

Time, as a topic of study, extends to virtually every area of intellectual inquiry and practical engagement. It impinges on the natural sciences, the social sciences, literature and the arts, politics, economics, religion, and private life. The various roles of time in these areas cannot be isolated from one another without loss. No one study, especially one of so restricted a length, can encompass this complexity. This is not surprising, since time, in any of its roles, is a fundamental aspect of all that occurs, a boundary condition on phenomena.

This book is a work in the history of philosophy. Although it is restricted to the ontology of time as it developed historically in European thought from ancient Greece through the contemporary traditions in western philosophy, the topic remains vast in scope. The difficulty in presenting this material is exacerbated by the necessity of explaining the various ontological positions in sufficient detail to make sense of the role and nature of time in each position. This has made the task of writing the book a seemingly endless series of decisions about what would have to be left out. I have not had the luxury to discuss, in detail, alternative interpretations of each position, nor why I have selected the interpretations I give. More frustrating has been the limited space for commenting on the wealth of differences and interconnections, often finely nuanced, between various positions.

In Part One, I have tried to present the various positions without pretending they are clearer or better supported than they appear. Instead, I have adopted the useful fiction that philosophical thought can be pictured as unfolding within and among the writings of philosophical thinkers. The hope is that clarifications and criticisms emerge as immanent in the history as it unfolds. Nor have I attempted to assess the strength of arguments and positions or

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