Global Communications, International Affairs and the Media since 1945

Global Communications, International Affairs and the Media since 1945

Global Communications, International Affairs and the Media since 1945

Global Communications, International Affairs and the Media since 1945

Synopsis

In Global Communications , Philip Taylor traces the increased involvement of the media in issues of war and peace from the nineteenth century to the present day, and analyses the nature, role and influence of communications within the international arena in the modern world. Using topical studies including the Gulf War and Vietnam, he shows how politicians, statesmen and soldiers have been increasingly forced to operate in the environment of mass communication and mass media, and explores the impact this has had on international relations and foreign policy.Providing a comprehensive historical context and including case study material, reference to theory, and practical examples, ^Global Communications is an invaluable and accessible guide to this rapidly growing field for students of communications studies, media studies, international relations and international history.

Excerpt

What we now refer to as ‘international’ history was the primary concern of those whose work is now recognised as the first attempt by Europeans to conduct a truly ‘historical’ investigation of the past, and it has remained a central preoccupation of historians ever since. Herodotus, who attempted to explain the Persian Wars, approached the subject quite differently from his successor, Thucydides. Herodotus believed that the answers to the questions that arose from the confrontation between the Persians and the Greeks would be found in the differences between the two cultures; accordingly, he examined the traditions, customs and beliefs of the two civilisations. Critics have long pointed out that he was haphazard in his selection and cavalier in his use of evidence. The same has never been said of Thucydides, who, in attempting to explain the Peloponnesian Wars, went about his task more methodically, and who was meticulous in his use of evidence. Over the next two thousand years, men like Machiavelli, Ranke and Toynbee have added to the tradition, but the underlying dichotomy between the ‘anthropological’ and the ‘archival’ approach has remained. Diplomatic historians have been condemned as mere archive-grubbers; diplomatic history as consisting of what one file-clerk said to another. The ‘world-historians’, the synthesisers, have been attacked for creating structures and patterns that never existed, for offering explanations that can never be tested against the available evidence.

The aim of ‘The New International History’ is to combine the two traditions, to bring Herodotus and Thucydides together. While drawing upon the enormous wealth of archival research conducted by those historians who continue to work in the political tradition of formal relations between states, the authors in this series will also draw upon other avenues of investigation that have become increasingly fruitful since the Second World War. Ideology and culture, immigration and communications, myths and stereotypes, trade and finance have come to be regarded by contemporary scholars as elements essential to a good understanding of international history, and yet, while these approaches are to be found in detailed monographs and scholarly

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