Citizenship, Nationality, and Migration in Europe

Citizenship, Nationality, and Migration in Europe

Citizenship, Nationality, and Migration in Europe

Citizenship, Nationality, and Migration in Europe

Synopsis

This volume combines international experts from a range of disciplines to explore key questions concerning patterns of migration, different national policies, and their relation to political, cultural and social processes in the 20th century.

Excerpt

The Maastricht Treaty is said to have established a European citizenship. the rationale of the leaders meeting at Maastricht in December 1991 was to correct or disguise the overly economic and financial nature of the treaty. But by instituting suffrage for nationals of the European Union in local and European elections without first reconciling each member state’s laws regarding nationality, the Union accepted the notion—probably false—that there are essential and unavoidable differences between the national traditions of each country. the method chosen by the leaders, far from creating a feeling of citizenship or allowing for the emergence of a true European citizenship, rather had the effect of upsetting the basic conditions for the integration of resident immigrants.

possible convergence of national legislation

The primary obstacle to the creation of European citizenship is the belief shared to a great extent in France as well as in Germany that the traditions of the different countries would be too difficult to reconcile. However, a more detailed socio-historical analysis of the origin of these nations and their legislation regarding nationality would have allowed the leaders to determine similarities among the laws and to emphasize these similarities.

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