From Constantine to Julian: Pagen and Byzantine Views; a Source History

From Constantine to Julian: Pagen and Byzantine Views; a Source History

From Constantine to Julian: Pagen and Byzantine Views; a Source History

From Constantine to Julian: Pagen and Byzantine Views; a Source History

Synopsis

From Constantine to Julian provides students with important source material, covering an age of major transition in Europe; an age which saw the establishment of Rome as a Christian Empire and a period of recidivism under Julian.Texts included are the anonymous Origo Constantini^; Eumenius, Panegyric of 310 ; Byzantine life of Constantine; Libanius, oration 59; and the Passion of Artemius . Most of this material has not previously been translated into English: students will now have direct access to the most important sources for the period which is studied on courses in classical antiquity, early medieval Europe and ecclesiastical history.

Excerpt

The Centre for Research in East Roman Studies at the University of Warwick was created in 1991 to co-ordinate a number of existing research projects which concern the history and archaeology of the Roman East. a new project adopted at the time of the launch was the investigation of pagan, Christian and Byzantine sources on the reign of Constantine. the result was a number of seminars based on the Vita Constantini of Eusebius, augmented by various translation projects on individual sources. the present first volume of the Centre’s monograph series reflects some of these activities. Though the book is entitled From Constantine to Julian, its main focus is on the reign of Constantine and that of his sons. the choice of the sources is decided partly by their importance to the political history of the period and partly by their general unavailability in English translation. Only the first text, the Origo Constantini, has been translated before, but the translation of J.C. Rolfe, though much used, is generally regarded as highly unsatisfactory and the accompanying commentary offers virtually no help to the research scholar. the remaining texts in the volume, to the best of our knowledge, have never before been published in English translation.

The editors would wish, first and foremost, to thank the translators: Dr Jane Stevenson, Research Fellow in British and Comparative Cultural Studies, Warwick University; Mark Vermes, Research Officer, Corpus Fontium Manichaeorum project based at the Centre; Frank Beetham, Honorary Lecturer in Classics, Birmingham University; and Michael Dodgeon, Classics Master, Solihull School. Mark Vermes also gave considerable assistance with the proof-reading. They would also like to thank Richard Stoneman for his interest and patience, and the staff of the Joint Library of the Hellenic and Roman Societies for their unfailing support, especially in fetching rare items

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