Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples

Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples

Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples

Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples

Synopsis

In many areas of the world, there has been an earlier indigenous population, which has been conquered by a more recent population group. In Social Welfare with Indigenous Peoples, the editors and contributors examine the treatment of many indigenous populations from five continental areas: Africa (Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe); Australasia, New Zealand; Central and South America (Brazil, Mexico); Europe (Scandinavia, Spain) and North America.
They found that, regardless of whether the newer immigrants became the majority population, as in North America, or the minority population, such as in Africa, there were many similarities in how the indigenous peoples were treated and in their current situations. This treatment is examined from many perspectives: political subjugation; negligence; shifting focus of social policy; social and legal discrimination; provision of social services; and ethnic, cultural and political rejuvenation.

Excerpt

In all of the inhabited areas of the world there has been an earlier population group (indigenous population) which has been subjugated or conquered by a more recent population group. This volume in comparative social welfare policy consists of representative articles from five continental areas: Africa (Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe); Australia/Pacific (Australia, New Zealand); Central and South America (Mexico, Brazil); Europe (Nordic countries, Spain) and North America (Canada and the United States).

Regardless of whether the newer immigrants become the majority population, such as in North America, or the minority population, such as in Africa, there are many similarities in how the indigenous populations were treated and in their current situation. the treatment of indigenous populations can be viewed from the perspective of political subjugation; negligence; shifting focus of social policy; social and legal discrimination; provision of social services; and ethnic, cultural and political rejuvenation.

political subjugation

In all of the countries represented there has been political subjugation of the indigenous population either through military action or economic/cultural encroachment. in all countries except two (Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe) there was initial subjugation, isolation and segregation of the indigenous populations, followed by a period of attempts at assimilation (an attempt to change and subvert the indigenous culture), followed again by periods of protection of the indigenous population up to the current demands for self-government, limited autonomy and legal rights.

In Africa (Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe) the circumstances were

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