Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint

Synopsis

Franz Brentano's classic study Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint was the most important of Brentano's works to be published in his lifetime.A new introduction by Peter Simons places Brentano's work in the context of current philosophical thought. He is able to show how Brentano has emerged since the 1970s as a key figure in both contemporary European and Anglo-American traditions and crucial to any understanding the recent history of philosophy and psychology.

Excerpt

Franz Brentano’s Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt was originally published in 1874 by Duncker & Humblot in Leipzig. It was divided into two books, and three additional books were supposed to follow, but never appeared. Another book entitled Vom sinnlichen und noetischen Bewusstsein is sometimes referred to as “Psychologie III”; it is not included here, although an English edition is planned. In 1911 Book Two of the Psychologie was reissued under the title Von der Klassifikation der psychischen Phänomene again by Duncker & Humblot. To this edition Brentano added some notes and appended several essays expanding upon and in some cases revising and correcting points made in the original text. In 1924 a second edition of Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkt, edited by Oskar Kraus, was published in Felix Meiner’s Philosophische Biblothek series in Leipzig. In addition to the supplementary essays which had been added in 1911, Kraus appended several more essays from Brentano’s Nachlass, and provided an Introduction and explanatory notes.

The present edition is a translation of Kraus’s 1924 edition although it differs in the following respects. It does not include the essay, “Miklosich on Subjectless Propositions.” Kraus had included this essay in the 1924 edition of the Psychologie and omitted it from his 1934 edition of Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis, the work to which Brentano had originally appended it. Since it has recently been restored to its place in that work in Roderick M. Chisholm’s English edition, The Origin of Our Knowledge of Right and Wrong (London and New York, 1969), I omit it here. The notes from Kraus’s edition, many of which are devoted to giving Kraus’s own interpretation of Brentano’s views, are included here. They can be distinguished from Brentano’s notes by their numerical designations. I have, however, abbreviated some and omitted others. References have been brought up to date and English editions have been cited whenever possible. The . . .

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