Kosovo and the Challenge of Humanitarian Intervention: Selective Indignation, Collective Action, and International Citizenship

Kosovo and the Challenge of Humanitarian Intervention: Selective Indignation, Collective Action, and International Citizenship

Kosovo and the Challenge of Humanitarian Intervention: Selective Indignation, Collective Action, and International Citizenship

Kosovo and the Challenge of Humanitarian Intervention: Selective Indignation, Collective Action, and International Citizenship

Synopsis

The Kosovo conflict has the potential to redraw the landscape of international politics, with significant ramifications for the UN, major powers, regional organizations, and the way in which we understand and interpret world politics. This book offers interpretations of the Kosovo crisis from numerous perspectives: the conflict-parties, NATO allies, the immediate region surrounding the conflict, and further afield. Country perspectives are followed by scholarly analyses of the longer-term normative, operational, and structural consequences of the Kosovo crisis for world politics.

Excerpt

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, Kosovo has been one of the most explosive conflict zones in Europe. Both sides, Serbs and Albanians, have made claims about history and ethnodemography to justify their alleged exclusive right to this ethnically mixed region. Since the disintegration of Yugoslavia in 1991, ethnic tensions in Kosovo have continued to rise. Kosovo Albanians have claimed the right to independence, while the Serbian authorities insisted on Kosovo's constitutional status as an integral part of Serbia. Although the escalation of violence had been predicted by numerous scholars and political observers, the international community proved unable to prevent it. From February 1998 onwards this bitter dispute developed into a full-scale armed conflict between the Albanian guerrilla Kosova Liberation Army on one side and the Serbian special police force as well as regular units of the Yugoslav military on the other. NATO's intervention against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia between 24 March and 9 June 1999 put an end to this horrific civil war, but the toll is tragic: at least 10,000 dead and 800,000 refugees and displaced persons; and large parts of the country have been ravaged.

Historical legacies – the Albanian question in Yugoslavia

The Kosovo conflict is embedded in the so-called Albanian question, which emerged at the end of the nineteenth century when the new Bal-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.