New Millennium, New Perspectives: The United Nations, Security, and Governance

New Millennium, New Perspectives: The United Nations, Security, and Governance

New Millennium, New Perspectives: The United Nations, Security, and Governance

New Millennium, New Perspectives: The United Nations, Security, and Governance

Synopsis

This publication contains papers that were presented at the United Nation University Millennium Conference held in Tokyo19-21 January 2000. The papers take stock of key international trends for peace, the environment, and development and governance, while considering their implications for the United Nations in the 21st Century. The implications and the recommendations arose from the following issues: the impact of globalisation; key challenges in the short and medium terms; the manner in which national governments and the international community might more broadly address the challenges; the comparative advantage the UN has, or could have, in working with the international community in addressing the challenges; the potential for partnerships among states, international organisations, commercial organisations and civil society in collectively addressing these challenges; and the element of 'surprise' or unpredictability and potential critical developments. The United Nations University has the mandate to link the worlds of scholarship and policy making. The aim of this volume is to contribute to this objective.

Excerpt

The business of the world has changed almost beyond recognition over the course of the last hundred years. At the turn of the last century, Japan was the first country outside Europe to break into the ranks of the great powers. Yet even until the Second World War, international affairs were largely Eurocentric in composition, concern, and agenda.

There are many more actors today, and their patterns of interaction are far more complex. In 1950, the soldier and the diplomat could still be said to symbolize the two lead actors on the world stage. In 2000, the international peace-keeper, financier, and NGO activist have noisily clambered aboard as well—not to mention the terrorist, the drug smuggler, and the currency speculator. The national bureaucrat must work alongside the international civil servant.

The United Nations

International organizations touch our daily lives in myriad ways. They are an essential means of conducting world affairs more satisfactorily than would be possible under conditions of international anarchy or total self-help. The United Nations lies at their legislative and normative centre.

One hundred years ago, although a considerable body of discourse and proposals had been advanced, the first large general international organi-

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