Do You Really Need Surgery? A Sensible Guide to Hysterectomy and Other Procedures for Women

Do You Really Need Surgery? A Sensible Guide to Hysterectomy and Other Procedures for Women

Do You Really Need Surgery? A Sensible Guide to Hysterectomy and Other Procedures for Women

Do You Really Need Surgery? A Sensible Guide to Hysterectomy and Other Procedures for Women

Synopsis

At last, here is a user-friendly guide to gynecologic surgery. The authors' guiding principle is that each woman for whom any kind of surgery is recommended should be well informed about the indications, the risks, and the expected results. Only with such knowledge can a woman make a sensible decision for herself. Using anecdotes drawn from a combined fifty years of experience, doctors Moore and de Costa provide clear and accurate information about women's anatomy, physiology, common gynecological ailments, diagnosis, alternative treatments, and, finally, full details about surgery itself. Among the surgeries discussed are removal of the uterus (hysterectomy), removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy), and removal of fibroids. The various ways of performing these procedures are examined, including minimally invasive surgery done through the laparoscope. The authors also help the patient through the postoperative phase, revealing what to expect, how to make the recovery easier, and how to take care ofherself after the surgery. The result is a book that empowers women as they weigh their options with regard to gynecologic surgery.

Excerpt

Cora is a tall, rangy redhead, whose freckles stood in stark contrast to the whiteness of her face on the day that she entered Caroline's examining rooms:

“I'm a single mom and it hasn't been easy. My Colin is eighteen now and soon off to the university and I feared being alone, but last summer, I met the most wonderful man and everything about our relationship is good … maybe it's because we're old enough now to appreciate each other. But, wouldn't you know, years of celibacy and now my periods suddenly have become so heavy that it's hard to find a good time to be sexual. Also, I'm getting more tired by the day. Another doctor said that I have fibroids and have to have a hysterectomy … no other option. This upsets me because I'd like at least to have the possibility of having a baby with Will. What do you think?”

Naeve had a hysterectomy when she was thirty-seven, thirteen years ago. Since her surgery, which was for endometriosis, she has barely given a thought to her reproductive system. This was a very welcome change from the monthly agony and heavy bleeding that she had experienced. Now, however, she is having hot flashes and soaking night sweats and came to see Michele to see if she could be going through menopause even though she had had a hysterectomy. She had just assumed that it was all taken care of.

In our practices, we hear stories like these every day. When faced with common gynecologic problems, women are too often not well informed about all the possible solutions, surgical or otherwise. Equally often, we see women who do not have a clear . . .

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