After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy

Synopsis

This book is a comprehensive study of cooperation among the advanced capitalist countries. Can cooperation persist without the dominance of a single power, such as the United States after World War II? To answer this pressing question, Robert Keohane analyzes the institutions, or "international regimes," through which cooperation has taken place in the world political economy and describes the evolution of these regimes as American hegemony has eroded. Refuting the idea that the decline of hegemony makes cooperation impossible, he views international regimes not as weak substitutes for world government but as devices for facilitating decentralized cooperation among egoistic actors. In the preface the author addresses the issue of cooperation after the end of the Soviet empire and with the renewed dominance of the United States, in security matters, as well as recent scholarship on cooperation.

Excerpt

In its genesis and support, this is an old-fashioned book. It is essentially the work of an individual scholar, unaided by a research team or largescale funding. Nevertheless, I have accumulated a number of institutional debts of gratitude during the seven years of research and writing. I benefited, during the early stages of reflection and reading, from being a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences during 1977–78, under a grant from the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Most of the research was done while I was teaching at Stanford University until the spring of 1981 and at Brandeis University since then. Stanford helped me to finance research assistance and a trip to the International Energy Agency in Paris in 1981. The Mazur Fund for Faculty Research at Brandeis supplied funds for photocopying the manuscript and circulating it to colleagues. Thanks to a sabbatical leave generously provided by Brandeis University for the academic year 1983–84, I was able to devote myself wholeheartedly, between June 1983 and January 1984, to preparing the final manuscript. Wellesley College permitted me to use its convenient and wellorganized library and to take advantage of its computer system for word-processing, which greatly expedited my work. Staff members of both the library and the computer center were most helpful. For all of this support I am most grateful.

The overall argument of this book has never appeared in print before, although “The demand for international regimes,” published in International Organization, Spring 1982, contains early versions of some of the core ideas of chapters 5–6. The theme of Part III—the complementarity of hegemony and cooperation in practice—is also first presented here, but some of the case material has been published before. Chapter 8 builds on “Hegemonic leadership and U.S. foreign economic policy in the ‘Long Decade’ of the 1950s,” published in William P. Avery and David P. Rapkin, eds., America in a Changing World Political Economy (New York: Longman, 1982). Chapter 9 is in part based on “The theory of hegemonic stability and changes in international economic regimes, 1967–1977.” Sections of this chapter that reproduce parts of the earlier article, in modified form, are reprinted by permission of Westview Press from Ole R. Holsti, Randolph M. Siverson, and Alexander L. George, eds., Change in the International System (copyright 1980 by Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado). Some of chapter 10 also appeared in “International agencies and the . . .

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