Iberian Fathers

Iberian Fathers

Iberian Fathers

Iberian Fathers

Excerpt

About the year 550, a ship from the Holy Land arrived at a harbor on the western coast of what is now Portugal, carrying among its passengers a young missionary named Martin who was destined to play an important role in the history of the Catholic Church among the people called Sueves. Of Martin's earlier life, we know only that he was born in Pannonia, part of which is now Hungary, and that he was educated in the East, where Greek was the common language. His training as a monk was based on the model of the ascetics in the Egyptian desert, but he realized that such a strict life could not be followed by the religious-minded Spaniards, and he lessened the severity of monastic regulations, just as Cassian had adapted oriental living for the Gauls. The Sueves in northwestern Spain had long been politically independent of the Visigoths, but Catholicism in their territory was mostly dominated by the Priscillianist heresy. It is reported that a king received Christian baptism in 448, but . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.