Hume on Morality

Hume on Morality

Hume on Morality

Hume on Morality

Synopsis

David Hume is widely recognised as the greatest philosopher to have written in the English language. His Treatise on Human Nature is one of the most important works of moral philosophy ever written. Hume on Morality introduces and assesses* Hume's life and the background of the Treatise * The ideas and text in the Treatise * Hume's continuing importance to philosophy

Excerpt

David Hume was born in Edinburgh in 1711 into a distinguished but not particularly wealthy family whose estate was in Ninewells, Berwickshire, near the border with England. Records reveal that the family name had been typically spelled ‘Home’, which was pronounced the same as ‘Hume’, although those less bureaucratic times allowed many variations including ‘Hoom’ and ‘Hum’. While the Homes had been in Berwickshire since at least the twelfth century, Hume’s direct ancestors occupied Ninewells since the fifteenth century. After the death of his father, Joseph Home, in 1713, Hume was raised, along with an elder brother and sister, by his mother Katherine. In his biography, Ernest Mossner records that

The family were Presbyterians, members of the established Church of Scotland. In politics they were Whigs, strongly approving the revolution of

Chapter 1

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