Creativity across the Primary Curriculum: Framing and Developing Practice

Creativity across the Primary Curriculum: Framing and Developing Practice

Creativity across the Primary Curriculum: Framing and Developing Practice

Creativity across the Primary Curriculum: Framing and Developing Practice

Synopsis

This book takes an inspirational look at how to foster children's creativity while following the guidelines in the National Curriculum. A practical book, it will ring bells with educators who value teaching within given guidelines but who also wish to teach with originality and scope.

Excerpt

This book was written out of my passionate commitment to foster imagination and creativity in all aspects of children’s learning, in the belief that these are ultimately critical for the constructive social development of the world, and for the infinite generative satisfaction of individuals living in it.

It is presented in four parts, representing different levels of and perspectives on creativity.

Part I, Creativity in children and teachers, lays the foundations for the book, introducing the perspectives from which the rest is written. These include a personal framework for creativity involving people, processes and domains and a close look at the nature of play in relation to creativity, since the two are often conflated.

In Chapter 1, I look at the nature of creativity and various definitions, introducing the notion of ‘little c’ creativity, with possibility thinking at its heart. I propose ‘little c’ creativity as enabling self-actualisation, and being manifest through a plural view of intelligence. I look at some characteristics of the ‘creating mind’, introducing a framework for exploring creativity in education.

Chapter 2 provides an unfoldment of some of the principles introduced in Chapter 1, namely the framework for creativity involving people, processes and domains. I do this through the presentation of experiences of two case study children.

Chapter 3 focuses on relationships between creativity and play. I draw a distinction between playful ideas and bodily play and explore how far play and creativity can meaningfully be conflated. Practical implications of these discussions for teaching and learning are explored. Finally I take a look at some of the issues raised by the formal curriculum for the early years as well as older primary children for educators fostering children’s creativity through play.

Part II, Creativity across the curriculum, explodes the notion that creativity is associated with the arts alone, working from the underpinning belief that creativity in the sense of possibility thinking is both required and stimulated by all subjects. Throughout Part II, I draw on case studies of children and their teachers. Each chapter includes reference to the current National Curriculum Orders for the subjects concerned, and the extent to which creativity is a part of these.

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