Conflict and Reconciliation in the Contemporary World

Conflict and Reconciliation in the Contemporary World

Conflict and Reconciliation in the Contemporary World

Conflict and Reconciliation in the Contemporary World

Synopsis

Conflict and Reconciliation in the Contemporary World gives a concise, original and multi-faceted introduction to the study of modern conflict situations. Using eight case- studies, from four continents: Yugoslavia, Israel, Northern Ireland, South Africa, El Salvador, Cambodia, Cyprus and Afghanistan, it includes discussion on:* threatened regional peace and security* cycles of internal discord, population displacement and violence* controversy over causes, progress and resolution* the value of external mediation, enforcement or intervention such as sanctions or "punishments"* means, timing and permanence of reconciliation.

Excerpt

If the conflict in Northern Ireland seems unresolved as the millennium is entered, a conflict in El Salvador (Central America) is said to be in sight of ‘fixed and final’ termination, provided that former adversaries can be reconciled. This is certainly the view of the un Secretary-General as a civil war is largely settled and transformed through negotiation. There may be an element of wish-fulfilment in this but what has taken place in El Salvador is an interesting example of how to deal with conflict and its aftermath. Central to the whole operation of resolving this conflict was the public establishment of the truth about what had happened. Knowing the truth through revelation, confession, amnesty and pardon would surely promote reconciliation among members of a shattered society.

el salvador as an area of conflict

El Salvador is the smallest of the South American republics. It lies between Honduras and the Pacific and is neighboured by Guatemala to the north and Nicaragua to the south. Five million people are crammed into the country, which has a greater population density than India. Nine out of ten live in the centre and west, where large estates, haciendas, grow coffee and cotton for export, recruiting labour from mostly illiterate workers whose poverty and servility are a legacy of Indian tribalism and Spanish colonial times. Whole families migrate to states or mines, or leave for nearby Honduras or Nicaragua. Two-thirds of the population live precariously on erratic incomes, and one-third exists in extreme poverty. Almost 60 per cent of the land is owned by 2 per cent of Salvadorans—a small oligarchy of estate owners and industrialists supported by military vigilance and the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. Today, the economy of El

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