Environment, Growth, and Development: The Concepts and Strategies of Sustainability

Environment, Growth, and Development: The Concepts and Strategies of Sustainability

Environment, Growth, and Development: The Concepts and Strategies of Sustainability

Environment, Growth, and Development: The Concepts and Strategies of Sustainability

Synopsis

Environment, Growth and Developmentoffers a unique analysis of sustainable economic growth and development and the implications for policy and planning at the local, national and global scale.of 'green accounting'. A complete revision and expansion ofEnvironmentand Development, this books offers a new focus on macroeconomic aspects.

Excerpt

It is now over a year since the final gavel came down on the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, that historic Earth Summit which fanned the embers of environmentalism into a blaze of worldwide enthusiasm and resolve to put a stop to humankind’s plunder of the Earth.

Optimism was high as the Earth Summit concluded. But what of the follow-up?

At the political level—and particularly among national governments—movement towards implementation of the principles contained in the Declaration of Rio and the action programme incorporated in Agenda 21 has not been conspicuous. in the year since Rio we have witnessed a tendency on the part of individual governments to lapse back to business as usual—not surprising, though nevertheless disappointing, in light of the immediate political and economic problems which continue to plague all governments. Notably, the large-scale commitments of new financial resources required for implementation of Agenda 21 have not been forthcoming. Indeed, a number of countries—including my own—have cut back on their Official Development Assistance.

But there have also been some unmistakably positive signs. in June 1993—on the first anniversary of the Earth Summit—the new administration in the United States signed the Treaty on Biodiversity, thus reversing that country’s disappointing abstention at Rio. President Clinton has also formed the President’s Council on Sustainable Development, a board including representatives of industry, government and environmental groups, charged with helping to formulate a national Sustainable Development Action Plan by the end of 1993.

At the international level, the United Nations has established its Sustainable Development Commission—an important recognition of the overriding importance of the subject. the commission is, of course, an intergovernmental body, but I hope that it will be open to the kinds of inputs by non-governmental actors that were the hallmark of Rio.

But if there is little encouragement to be drawn from the response of governments, and some caution regarding the efficacy of the un

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