Whose Education for All? The Recolonization of the African Mind

Whose Education for All? The Recolonization of the African Mind

Whose Education for All? The Recolonization of the African Mind

Whose Education for All? The Recolonization of the African Mind

Synopsis

Exploring the challenges and controversies surrounding African education today, this text mixes scholarly analysis with anecdotal evidence. It comprehensively examines the intellectual recolonization of Africa.

Excerpt

It is now twelve years since my professorship was transferred from the Institute for Eductional Research, University of Oslo, to the Department of Education at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, for a four-and-a-half-year period (1987-92). For this arrangement I am especially grateful to three people: Sissel Volan in NORAD (the Norwegian Agency for Development), Professor Abel Ishumi at the University of Dar es Salaam; and Olav Trovik, the late Vice Chancellor of the University of Oslo. Sissel, a completely overworked woman in a donor agency, is in a position of bureaucratic imagination and if there had been more resources at her disposal it would have been to the benefit of the education sector in Africa. Abel Ishumi, who spent a year at my institute in Norway when I was the administrative head of the social education department of our institute, and with whom I had some cooperation then, was my initial contact to the University of Dar and did a lot to smooth my entry.

The years at the University of Dar es Salaam have had a profound effect on my authorship and research interests. Without those four and a half years this book could not have been written. I dedicate the book to my colleagues in the Faculty of Education in respect for the great work they do under difficult circumstances. I especially want to thank Naomi Katunzi, Suleman Sumra, Mwajabu Possi, and George Malekela for stimulating talks. I do hope that in this book I have recaptured some of the intellectually stimulating and critical tone in the student-staff seminars which were going on weekly in my time on the faculty. I have also tried to recapture the anectodal tone from the tea-time (wakati wa chai)

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