Dialogue with the Mediterranean: The Role of NATO's Mediterranean Initiative

Dialogue with the Mediterranean: The Role of NATO's Mediterranean Initiative

Dialogue with the Mediterranean: The Role of NATO's Mediterranean Initiative

Dialogue with the Mediterranean: The Role of NATO's Mediterranean Initiative

Synopsis

The first examination of the importance of NATO's Mediterranean Initiative for the security and stability of the Euro-Mediterranean area, this book discusses the challenges, risks, and possible threats to NATO member states which may stem from the southern and eastern Mediterranean.

Excerpt

Gareth Winrow’s new book confronts issues critical to the future of peace and prosperity in Europe and the Middle East. It is a pioneering work, dealing with an agenda of change along the political fault lines dividing the peoples of the “Euro-Mediterranean region.” As Winrow cautions in the book’s Conclusion, it is too early to speak of a sense of community among the states straddling the Mediterranean. But just as NATO’s Mediterranean Initiative is a project in the creation of just such a community, so too is Winrow’s analysis of it a big step in the scholarship of comtemporary relations between the European North and the largely Arab and Muslim South.

Events in Bosnia and Kosovo have recently demonstrated that it takes a good deal of professional courage to assess the meaning of the recent past and to speculate on the probabilities of the future. Good political science, however, does not shrink from this challenge, and Winrow’s study of the NATO-Mediterranean dialogue tackles the complexities of relationships across cultural barriers with an aplomb that only a master of his material can muster. In the process Winrow has made a major contribution to the scholarship of the Atlantic Alliance as an institution-in-transformation. Since the Cold War a good deal of ink has flowed over change within the Alliance, but very little has been devoted to NATO’s involvement in the development of civil society among the states of the Mediterranean beyond its crisis-management commitments in the former Yugoslavia. The latter has made the Alliance indispensible to the maintenance of peace in the Balkans, but at the same time NATO briefings are now routinely attended by delegations from Israel and the Arab

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