Exceptionally Gifted Children

Exceptionally Gifted Children

Exceptionally Gifted Children

Exceptionally Gifted Children

Excerpt

In the ordinary elementary school situation, children of IQ 140 waste half their time. Those above IQ 170 waste practically all their time. With little to do, how can these children develop powers of sustained effort, respect for the task, or habits of steady work?

(Hollingworth, 1942, p. 299)

Hadley Bond, aged 22 months, was out for a walk with his mother. Although it was late autumn in the southern Australian city where they lived, the sun was still warm, and Hadley was becoming weary. His steps began to falter. Holly, his mother, checked her watch and found that they had been out for rather longer than she had intended. ‘My goodness, Hadley,’ she said, ‘can you guess how long we’ve been walking?’ ‘About 26 1/2 minutes, I think,’ said Hadley—and he was right!

Hadley was the third son born to Holly and Robert Bond. Adrian, aged 8 at Hadley’s birth, and John, aged almost 6, were intelligent, quick-witted children, perceptive, intellectually curious and academically successful at school. The family quickly realized, however, that Hadley’s abilities went far beyond anything they could have imagined. He was a child of truly phenomenal mathematical ability. By 18 months of age he was already fascinated by the maths drill programs which John and Adrian had used on the family’s home computer. He delighted in simple addition problems. He would squat on the floor working out the answer to a question with plastic beads and then joyously type it into the computer, laughing with delight when the response was verified. He had taught himself to read before the age of 18 months and by his second birthday he had his own library of small books which he read with great enjoyment.

By the time Hadley turned 5 he had, with the help of the computer, taught himself to add, subtract, multiply and divide. He was fascinated by maths problems and enjoyed developing his own. He had the reading and comprehension skills of an 8-year-old and avidly read everything he could get his hands on. He passionately wanted to go to school where, he believed, his learning would progress even more speedily and he would

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