Crime, Policing, and Place: Essays in Environmental Criminology

Crime, Policing, and Place: Essays in Environmental Criminology

Crime, Policing, and Place: Essays in Environmental Criminology

Crime, Policing, and Place: Essays in Environmental Criminology

Synopsis

A comprehensive and up-to-date examination of a number of key crime and policing issues. Drawing on case material, the book examines the significance of spatial patterns of crime and the processes which produce them.

Excerpt

David J. Evans, Nicholas R. Fyfe and David T. Herbert

As the interface between crime and policing is of critical importance in the fight against rising crime rates, so analysis intended to provide a clearer understanding of this interface must rank highly in the research priorities of criminological studies. Academics have frequently raised serious questions on the roles of the police. the efficacy of the data which the police collect and which form the bases for official crime statistics has been and remains a major issue in its own right. Similarly the effectiveness of policing has been questioned by criminologists; evaluations of specific policing strategies remain ambiguous in their main findings. Much of this criticism has proved difficult to counter but it should also be recognized that academics have been distinctly coy in terms of bringing forward alternative proposals. It should also be recognized that at various points in the methodological debates on the sources of crime, the ‘us and them’ dichotomy has placed the official agencies of law and order on the ‘them’ side of the debate. There are now many more signs of constructive collaboration and the chapters in this book will reflect these changes. Academics can show that there are more efficient ways of collecting crime data which, while they will not eliminate all of the problems, are steps in the right direction. Some of the major initiatives in crime prevention can be linked to findings of academic research which when put into practice provide positive results. Both these examples provide connections with the other special feature of this collection of essays: they are concerned with new spatial perspectives and form part of a specialism which can be labelled as environmental criminology. the more efficient ways of collecting data are those emanating from the impact of geographic information systems (GIS) which is a more general set of procedures but one well suited to the collecting

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