Integration and the Support Service: Changing Roles in Special Education

Integration and the Support Service: Changing Roles in Special Education

Integration and the Support Service: Changing Roles in Special Education

Integration and the Support Service: Changing Roles in Special Education

Synopsis

The integration of children with special needs into mainstream schools demands a reorganisation of staff and support levels both in schools and in the advisory services. Integration and the Support Service, illustrated with examples from a detailed case study of one Local Education Authority, shows how support services can most effectively be matched to needs and how new strategies for integration can be developed.

Excerpt

The 1981 Education Act set a course for the education of children with special educational needs (SEN) in the UK; they were to be brought as far as possible into the mainstream of educational provision. Critics of the Act have pointed out that the legislation allowed for wide margins of interpretation of this mandate, but for all that there is not an LEA that has not been affected in some degree by this statutory drive to integration.

The changes which the Act called for—if not demanded—have been felt throughout schools and LEAs, and the central principle of reorganization is that of support; support for learners so that they can participate in the curriculum without distinction from their peers; and support for teachers so that their teaching is differentiated for process rather than goal.

Where the changes have been remarkable, a great deal of the necessary support has come from within schools; the disbanding of ‘remedial’ classes and ‘remedial’ teachers has most often led to the setting up of in-class support systems with limited withdrawal of pupils, frequently within ‘whole-school SEN policies’. In these systems, teachers who might previously have attended withdrawn groups of remedial pupils now make up their timetable supporting those individuals as they follow a ‘normal’ curriculum. ‘Support’ is also sometimes offered to subject teachers variously in the appropriate preparation of their teaching material, in its actual delivery to the class as a whole and in the evaluation of its outcomes.

This book is concerned with the mostly parallel changes that are taking place within the broader systems of support at LEA level; the ways in which LEAs organize their support services for schools and their staffs. In particular, the book addresses the issues facing LEAs with a typical array of special educational needs, and an array of

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.