Service Industries: A Geographical Appraisal

Service Industries: A Geographical Appraisal

Service Industries: A Geographical Appraisal

Service Industries: A Geographical Appraisal

Synopsis

The first major synthesis of an emerging geography which is undoubtedly changing the way in which academics, planners and policy-makers identify and interpret the spatial development of cities and regions in the 1980s.

Excerpt

Service industries are quite as heterogeneous as the topics now encompassed in the research undertaken by contemporary geographers. Consequently the task of devising a consistent framework around which to write a geographical text about service industries is far from straightforward. As a geographer one is, of course, interested in the spatial pattern of phenomena and the processes responsible for their growth, location, accessibility and changing distribution. But such is the diversity of the service sector that it defies application of a principal theory, a particular analytical method, or a dominant mode of interpretation. This problem exists in most lines of geographical enquiry but it seems particularly acute when service industries are being considered. Indeed this may explain their long-standing neglect both within geography and by other disciplines.

Courses which explore themes in economic or urban geography must, in general, rely heavily on texts in which manufacturing industries receive prominent coverage, while services are only selectively discussed, most notably retailing and transport which have long been a target for intensive research by urban/economic geographers. Service Industries: a geographical appraisal has, therefore, been put together in the belief that while the significance of service industries for many facets of socio-economic development and spatial organization is now much more readily acknowledged than at any time in the past, there is room for an undergraduate and graduate text which attempts to demonstrate in a structured and systematic way the diverse and pervasive role of service industries in modern economic systems. the present book follows from my preliminary, and highly distilled, text produced for use in sixth forms and at first-year undergraduate level (Service Industries: Growth and Location, Cambridge University Press, 1982), but it is longer, more comprehensive and substantive.

A number of broad objectives—each of which is not mutually exclusive—have guided the preparation of this book. It is important to state at the outset that an attempt has not been made to put forward a new geographical interpretation of the recent expansion of service industries based on original research; the intent is much more modest, and it is essentially to synthesize recent work by geographers and others in a way that may be helpful to students encountering the geography of services for the first time. Initially, then, it seems important to acquaint students with the basic characteristics, purpose and diversity of service sector activities and this must incorporate some discussion of the variety—often very eclectic—of approaches to the study of services. An

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.