Hillslope Form

Hillslope Form

Hillslope Form

Hillslope Form

Synopsis

The study of hillslopes is a central element of geomorphology, and has been the cause of many of the major methodological disputes in the subject. This book describes the present state of knowledge of hillslope form, the results of measurements of hillslope form and points to unresolved problems in the understanding of it. The book deals with observed variations in hillslope form across the surface of the earth and concludes by examining the influence of man on hillslopes and assessing the contribution that the understanding of natural hillslopes may make to the management of man-made inclines.

Excerpt

Geomorphology remains largely a field-based science. Notwithstanding the significant advances during recent years in the theoretical and laboratory-based aspects of the subject, most books in geomorphology continue to reflect the locations in which their authors have worked and studied. I have had the good fortune to examine hillslopes in a variety of climatic and geologic settings. As a research student of Ronnie Savigear, I was given opportunities to travel well beyond my own field area in southern Italy. Projects in Morocco, Australia and Argentina allowed me the chance to see hillslopes in these countries as well as in others that I could find the time to visit on my way to or from fieldwork. My susequent career has taken me to other parts of Europe, Africa and Australasia, and more recently to North America. I am particularly grateful to Ronnie Savigear for the early opportunities and to others who have contributed, one way or another, to enable me to continue learning about hillslopes.

Despite the opportunities, gaps remain. I am aware that the book draws most of its examples from humid temperate and warm semi-arid to arid climates. The former is the environment in which I have, for the most part, lived: the latter is the climatic setting in which I prefer to undertake fieldwork. The book would be improved by a wider range of examples and I apologise in advance to any who read this book and whose interests lie in other environments. To them the book may seem excessively biased.

In recent years, my fieldwork has benefited from the support of my wife, Susan. Many times she has acted as an unpaid, conscripted field

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