Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

Synopsis

Framing the West argues that photography was intrinsic to British territorial expansion and settlement on the northwest coast. Williams shows how male and female settlers used photography to establish control over the territory and its indigenous inhabitants, as well as how native peoples eventually turned the technology to their own purposes. Photographs of the region were used to stimulate British immigration and entrepreneuralism, and imagies of babies and children were designed to advertise the population growth of the settlers. Although Indians were taken by Anglos to document their "disappearing" traditions and to show the success of missionary activities, many Indians proved receptive to photography and turned posing for the white man's camera to their own advantage. This book will appeal to those interested in the history of the West, imperialism, gender, photography, and First Nations/Native America.

Excerpt

At two o clock I took a photographic view of the Ahouset village—Capcha the Chief—which appeared to contain about 500 inhabitants, it is a long village situated in a beautiful bay, at the foot of a large rounded mountain covered with pine trees, when I put my head under the focusing cloth of the camera to my surprise on withdrawing it, I found myself surrounded by about twenty of the natives squatting on the ground watching my movement, and as I had chose a small hillock jutting out into the bay on the right hand side to get a full view of the village, I could not imagine how they came there without being seen, so I packed up the camera as quickly as possible, and found in my pocket a plug of tobacco which I cut into small pieces and give them to the natives as far as they would hold out, and then raised my hand to them and dattawaed [sic] to the dingy.

Frederick dally,Memoranda of a trip round Vancouver Island and Nootka Island on board hms Scout, Capt. Price, for the purpose of visiting the Indian Tribes by his Excellency Sir A. E. Kennedy the Governor, August 10, 1866

Mr. R. Maynard of this city accompanied the Superintendent of Indians Affairs in the Boxer on the recent trip to the north, and has secured several excellent pictures. the first affords a fine view of the Indian village at Knights Inlet, with the powerful tribe grouped in the foreground, and the Supr., Capt. Fitzgerald, Capt. Moffat, and officers of hms Boxer in the rear. No. I is a . . .

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