Japan and Ballistic Missile Defense

Japan and Ballistic Missile Defense

Japan and Ballistic Missile Defense

Japan and Ballistic Missile Defense

Synopsis

Spurred by a perceived growing ballisic missile threat from within the Asia-Pacific region and requests from the U.S. to support research and development on components of a missile defense system, the Japanese government decided in late 1998 and early 99 to move forward with joint research and development with the U.S. on ballistic missile defense. This book explores both the benefits and potential problems of deploying a BMD system in Japan.

Excerpt

This study seeks to identify and examine the many factors influencing Japan's approach to the issue of ballistic missile defense (BMD), including the perceptions, motives, and interests of key Japanese players; the role of the United States; the Japanese decisionmaking process regarding BMD issues; and the dynamics of critical considerations such as alliance maintenance, cost, feasibility, commercial and legal factors, political or bureaucratic competition, and the behavior of the People's Republic of China. The purpose of this examination is to assess the pros and cons of various options available to Japan, to identify the most likely courses of Japan's future BMD development, and to discern the possible implications of such development for the U.S.-Japan alliance and Asian stability.

This report should be of interest to scholars, journalists, students, and other members of the public who seek a better understanding of the Japanese political process concerning ballistic missile defense and its impact on the likelihood for continued cooperation in the development of a theater missile defense system in Northeast Asia. The authors hope it will be of particular use to policymakers on both sides of the Pacific as they work toward building a more durable U.S. Japan security partnership that continues to contribute to peace and stability in the region.

This research was sponsored by the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership and was conducted in the International Security and Defense Policy Center of RAND's National Security Research Division (NSRD). Supplemental funding for this project was provided by NSRD and the RAND Center for Asia -Pacific Policy (CAPP).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.