Henry Kissinger: The Anguish of Power

Henry Kissinger: The Anguish of Power

Henry Kissinger: The Anguish of Power

Henry Kissinger: The Anguish of Power

Excerpt

There was a time when Henry Kissinger could do no wrong. While men around him crumbled, he went on to even greater heights. Not only did he wield great power; he was also fervently admired. As a negotiator, he was compared to a magician. Next to him, great stars paled into insignificance in the political firmament. He was like a comet blazing brightly in a darkened sky.

But then the comet flickered and the brightness waned. Suddenly, Kissinger was accused of doing nothing right. Critics appeared from everywhere and nowhere. Attacks were heaped upon him in a rising chorus of ferocity. One looked in vain for a word of kindness, let alone of praise.

I have watched the American public's attitude toward Henry Kissinger with rising consternation. I must confess to an uneasy suspicion that many people who invested Kissinger with magic in his halcyon days, may have made him a symbol of their own hunger for a moment of perfection and of glory. And I suspect that many of those who later attacked him without mercy might have done so out of their own frustration, bitterness, and disappointment. What has been sadly lacking, however, is a sense of reality and balance.

This book is an effort to redress that balance. Henry Kissinger is a man of great intelligence who fashioned a foreign policy that evolved over a quarter century of reflection and experience. I have attempted to portray the human being and the statesman behind the myths of accolade and condemnation. Reality is complex and seldom black and white. One should think about it with a sense of its nuances and colors. Kissinger is no exception.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.