The Jewish Novel in the Ancient World

The Jewish Novel in the Ancient World

The Jewish Novel in the Ancient World

The Jewish Novel in the Ancient World

Synopsis

Lawrence M. Wills delineates the techniques and motifs of the Jewish novel, shows how the genre both initiated and distanced itself from nonfictional prose, and describes the social conditions governing its emergence and reception. He also places the Jewish novel in historical context, between the Hebrew Bible and subsequent developments in Jewish and Christian literature.

Excerpt

Gregory Nagy

The ancient Jewish novel, as described by Lawrence M. Wills, is a bridge between the Hebrew Bible and the genre known to Classicists as the Greek novel. As familiar parts of Jewish sacred scripture, books like Daniel or Esther may elude levels of analysis which apply to such overtly secular productions as Daphnis and Chloe, in vogue among the reading public of the late Hellenic world. Conversely, the study of the Greek novel in its historical context is impoverished by the neglect of comparable media in neighboring cultures. Such a medium is the Jewish novel, as Wills reconstructs it in its own historical context. His reconstruction gives rise to a rigorous comparison between the Greek and the Jewish forms of the novel, which yields important new insights into the mythology and poetics of this evolving genre.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.