Sodomy and Interpretation: Marlowe to Milton

Sodomy and Interpretation: Marlowe to Milton

Sodomy and Interpretation: Marlowe to Milton

Sodomy and Interpretation: Marlowe to Milton

Excerpt

When this book began, it seemed to be an isolated and risky endeavor. Nobody would outright deny the interest of the project, but neither would anybody outright endorse it. It seemed that I was treading a fine line between an expansion of gender studies and a lapse into the unconscionable. Happily, I find the book entering the world as a member of a community. The growth of gay and lesbian history, the development of a queer theoretical practice, and the emergence of a radical lavender left within the academy, while not necessarily making the project possible, have all in some way contributed to my ability to realize it fully. It would be both morally and politically irresponsible not to mention the names of those whose works played a central role in these developments: John Boswell, Alan Bray, Louis Crompton, Robert K. Martin, Kenneth Plummer, James Saslow, and Jeffrey Weeks, among others. I have also been influenced by the pioneering theoretical work of Sue-Ellen Case, Teresa de Lauretis, David Halperin, D. A. Miller, and Eve Sedgwick. I find myself, therefore, an author of a text that resembles Roland Barthes's conception: "not a line of words releasing a single 'theological' meaning . . . but a multi-dimensional space in which a variety of writings, none of them original, blend and clash."

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