Industrial Policy in Europe: Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Proposals

Industrial Policy in Europe: Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Proposals

Industrial Policy in Europe: Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Proposals

Industrial Policy in Europe: Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Proposals

Synopsis

In this volume Europe's leading industrial economists explore the theoretical basis for industrial policy in Europe and practical proposals for making industrial development happen. They approach the subject on a micro-, macro- and meso- level.

Excerpt

This book was fashioned out of papers presented at the Warwick Conference of the European Network on Industrial Policy (EUNIP) in December 1997 which focused on Practical Proposals for Industrial Policy in Europe. This particular meeting was the culmination of the first phase of EUNIP covering activities over the period since the launch of the project at a workshop at the University of Birmingham in September 1993. This first phase of the activity of EUNIP was funded largely by the European Union Human Capital Mobility Programme and included a PhD research programme as well as a series of workshops and conferences across Europe. EUNIP is continuing as a largely self-financed network which will sponsor an annual conference, the first being held in October 1998 at Universidad de Barcelona.

Over the first phase of EUNIP much was achieved in terms of creating an active and stimulating network of researchers concerned with industrial policy issues. The final meeting of the first phase sought to concentrate on practical proposals for industrial policy in Europe as a means of maximising the impact of the work of the network in evolving a particular approach to policy-making which we see as both new and exciting, but also particularly appropriate at this stage of Europe’s development. We are endeavouring to descend from the ivory tower we have been occupying in order, hopefully, to capture the attention and interest of policy-makers for ideas which may appear sometimes rather divorced from the practical world of politics within which they have to operate. Undoubtedly this transition in our work will not be unproblematic, but at least we have seriously sought to achieve it, specifically in response to the constructive assessments of policy-makers made at our conference at the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, London in June 1997.

Given that the general approach to policy-making by the network has evolved continuously over the past several years it seems useful to try and crystallise out the present stage in our thinking, whilst recognising that different individuals within the network will give particular emphasis to particular aspects of our collective approach. Undoubtedly the view presented here will represent a more accurate description of Keith Cowling’s view on policy than that of other members of the network, but I hope that the views

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