Studies in General and English Phonetics: Essays in Honour of Professor J.D. O'Connor

Studies in General and English Phonetics: Essays in Honour of Professor J.D. O'Connor

Studies in General and English Phonetics: Essays in Honour of Professor J.D. O'Connor

Studies in General and English Phonetics: Essays in Honour of Professor J.D. O'Connor

Synopsis

Rhythm, intonation, exotic and familiar languages as well as computer-sythesized audio-communications, procedures in forensic linguistics, pronunciation lexicography, language change and sociological aspects of speech such as English regional accents and dialects in Britain and other parts of the world are covered in these thirty-eight articles in tribute to Professor J.D. O'Connor by an international list of contributors, including many world famous names. With an invaluable up-to-date bibliography, no university library will be complete without it.

Excerpt

We returned to UCL from war service in October 1945, Doc and I, but whereas he had managed to finish his degree before enlisting, I had only just begun. So we first met on opposite sides of the lectern, he a young lecturer, wittily and effortlessly expounding English phonology, I an overage undergraduate, admiringly and enviously listening—and trying to learn.

Despite the passing of nearly fifty years, the teacher-pupil gap has never closed, but to my pleasure and pride it soon narrowed to the point when I could call him friend as well as teacher, could refer to him as ‘Doc’ without feeling guilty of name-dropping, and in due course (we moved slowly in those days) could so address him without feeling presumptuous.

The department was led at that time by Daniel Jones (widely known—if not widely addressed—as D.J.), who seemed to me simultaneously shy and austere, not easy to know. In contrast, Doc was prominent among a group of colleagues who were delightfully at ease with each other and their students: A.C. Gimson, of course, Hélène Coustenoble (also known as Gim and Cou), Dennis Fry, Gordon Arnold, Olive Tooley, Julian Pring, Marguérite Chapallaz, John Trim. And despite attacks by the grim reaper, it has been a special pleasure week by week to see several of those colleagues and friends foregather in the UCL common room—at a particular table, on a particular day: joined too, in consequence, by former students from the international community of those who have looked to Doc and his peers for advice, information, good company and sheer fun.

His peers? Well, no. It would be hard to find any colleague making claim to be his peer, for Doc is quite unique: primus no matter who else he is inter, even this splendid gathering of linguists intent, in the pages that follow, on honouring him.

Randolph Quirk

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