Nominalizations

Nominalizations

Nominalizations

Nominalizations

Synopsis

Based on extensive and diverse material from 70 languages, and covering a range of previously undiscussed problems, this book provides a thorough analysis of how nominalization types interact with other structural features. It focuses on action nominal constructions, and in particular, the comparison of their syntactic structure with that of finite clauses and of other noun phrases, a problem which has claimed much attention in current syntactic theories. Supported by rich empirical material and clearly illustrated with examples from all the sample languages, the book provides a detailed and consistent basis for constructing a typology of derived constructions and for presenting cross-linguistic comparisons.

Excerpt

This book is mainly concerned with a single type of nominalizations, action nominal constructions. Its aim is to make a cross-linguistic comparison between the internal syntax of action nominal constructions (ANCs) and that of two other types of constructions: the corresponding finite clauses and ordinary noun phrases. the main question raised by such a comparison can be formulated as follows: what are the means of signalling the relations between an action nominal and its dependents (subject and objects) as compared to the relationships in corresponding finite clauses and in ordinary noun phrases? Taking one easy example, what is the internal syntax of the construction the enemy’s destruction of the city as related both to the finite clause The enemy destroyed the city and to the np the enemy’s map of the city?

In the linguistics of the last three decades, it is possible to discern two different approaches to the internal syntax of nominalizations, or, more specifically, of action nominal constructions. the first approach concentrates on how to derive nominalizations in transformational grammar. in early work (Chomsky 1957, Lees 1960), nominalizations were analysed as results of transformations. Chomsky (1970) argues against the transformationalist hypothesis for the derivation of action nominal constructions in English, and proposes the lexicalist hypothesis, according to which action nominals constitute separate items in the lexicon. Chomsky’s argumentation is based on the regular similarities in the syntax of action nominals and of non-derived nouns, as well as on the idiosyncratic differences in the morphology, syntax and semantics of action nominals and the corresponding verbs. the derivation of action nominal constructions in other languages has also been the object of attention for several syntactic theories. To cite a few examples, action nominal constructions in German (Esau 1973),

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.