Rethinking University Teaching: A Framework for the Effective Use of Educational Technology

Rethinking University Teaching: A Framework for the Effective Use of Educational Technology

Rethinking University Teaching: A Framework for the Effective Use of Educational Technology

Rethinking University Teaching: A Framework for the Effective Use of Educational Technology

Synopsis

An invaluable aid in increasing teachers' understanding of the new technological media, showing how it can improve student learning and teaching efficiency.

Excerpt

Since the first edition of this book, there have been extensive changes in the technologies available for learning. The Web has become established, interface design has matured, and PC access has become widespread. The demands of technological change have hindered the theory and practice of its application, however. Learning technologies are unfamiliar and complex. Few of the current generation of academics have ever learned through technology, so practice develops slowly, and theory hardly at all. Fortunately, the Conversational Framework introduced in the first edition has proved to be remarkably robust in the face of the new technologies. Its development has benefited from application, and from discussions with many academics, and their critiques have contributed to elaboration of the original theory.

The revisions to the first edition are extensive because the general principles of learning design are communicated most convincingly through the detail of example. And illustrative examples change with the technology. Part I updates the research studies on students’ learning needs, creating the challenge that new technologies must meet. Part II extends the Conversational Framework to test how well new media contribute to academic learning. Five different types of learning media are illustrated by examples drawn from recent innovative learning materials. Part III revises the design methodology for the course material and its programme context.

As before, this edition finishes with a blueprint for a university infrastructure that is not sidetracked by the uncertain notion of an ‘e-university’ or an ‘online university’. The integrity of the academic institution is paramount. Throughout the book there remains the fundamental assumption that a university is defined by the quality of its academic conversations, not by the technologies that service them.

Diana Laurillard

London, February 2001

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