Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice, and Training

Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice, and Training

Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice, and Training

Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice, and Training

Synopsis

Gender planning is not an end in itself but a means by which women, through a process of empowerment, can emancipate themselves. Ultimately, its success depends on the capacity of women's organizations to confront subordination and create successful alliances which will provide constructive support in negotiating women's needs at the level of household, civil society, the state and the global system.
Gender Planning and Developmentprovides an introduction to an issue of primary importance and constant debate. It will be essential reading for academics, practitioners, undergraduates and trainees in anthropology, development studies, women's studies and social policy.

Excerpt

This book describes the development of gender planning as a legitimate planning tradition in its own right. the goal of gender planning is the emancipation of women from their subordination, and their achievement of equality, equity and empowerment. This will vary widely in different contexts depending on the extent to which women as a category are subordinated in status to men as a category. the knowledge base explored in recent feminist and development debates provides the conceptual rationale for several key principles. These in turn translate into tools and techniques for a gender planning process. These analytical principles relate to gender roles and gender needs, also to control over resources and decision-making in the household, civil society and state. the procedures by which gender planning is operationalized as well as the framework within which it is institutionalized also require identification and acknowledgement before this new planning tradition is to attain legitimacy. For such a new planning tradition there is still a long way to go—what follows can only be a starting point documenting the development of gender planning over the last decade.

Why should the issue of gender constitute a legitimate planning tradition in its own right? To answer such a question it is necessary to start by examining both the current agenda of ‘women in development’ and the planning preoccupations of those involved in developing countries. For in the world of policy and planning where fashions come and go, women and development concerns are a peculiar anomaly. They resolutely refuse to disappear. However, unlike other recent contenders, such as the environment, they have not succeeded in attaining planning legitimacy. Why has it been so easy for environmental planning to gain identity as a separate planning tradition, and yet so difficult for the ‘women in development’ approach? Why do the proliferating numbers of policies and plans of action for women still only too frequently fail to be translated into practice? Why are Women’s Ministries so effectively excluded from national planning processes and marginalized in terms of resource allocation?

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