A Handbook of Dispute Resolution: ADR in Action

A Handbook of Dispute Resolution: ADR in Action

A Handbook of Dispute Resolution: ADR in Action

A Handbook of Dispute Resolution: ADR in Action

Excerpt

The concept for this volume was fashioned as a consequence of a Workshop held at the University of Nottingham in 1988, probably the first Workshop in the UK to consider Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in depth across a range of fields of dispute. A number of the chapters were first presented in an earlier version at the Workshop while others have been commissioned and written since in an attempt to provide a comprehensive introduction to developments in ADR. Inevitably there are many who contributed to the Workshop and others who influenced this book and my thinking on dispute resolution, and my thanks go to them; my apologies go to those whose work would have appeared in this volume had I been producing an encyclopaedia rather than a more limited text. In particular I wish to thank Professor William Twining and Dr Sally Lloyd-Bostock, who consulted on the development of the Workshop, and Jane Rudge for her committed help and support in the organization and administration both of the Workshop and later with the process of putting together this volume. In the United States Tom Colosi and Robert Coulson of the American Arbitration Association and James Henry of the Center for Public Resources helped me understand the American scene, an understanding which was deepened by participation in the American Bar Association 1989 conference on dispute resolution; David Newton, Howard Ambrose and many others in Australia helped me sense the possibilities of dispute resolution systems. Finally, I should thank my mother and father for giving me an early insight into disputes domestic and international; Ann, Karen and Alan for their various tough lessons in negotiation and disputes management outside the world of theory; and ACAS for their support for my development as an arbitrator and mediator.

A number of more formal thanks are also appropriate:

To the Civil Justice Quarterly (Sweet & Maxwell), which originally published in earlier versions Chapter 9 by John Birds and Cosmo Graham and Chapter 12 by Richard Thomas.

To Arbitration, the journal of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, which published part of the final chapter of this volume.

To the American Arbitration Association for permission to reprint the AAA Mediation Course Outline and Observers’ Sheets.

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