Housing the Poor in the Developing World: Methods of Analysis, Case Studies, and Policy

Housing the Poor in the Developing World: Methods of Analysis, Case Studies, and Policy

Housing the Poor in the Developing World: Methods of Analysis, Case Studies, and Policy

Housing the Poor in the Developing World: Methods of Analysis, Case Studies, and Policy

Synopsis

The methodology of housing and planning in the developing world has largely been adapted from practice in post-industrial countries. Housing the Poor in the Developing Worldshows how methods of analysis can be best suited to the local context. This study meets the need to bring together methods of analysis from several disciplines which can be applied to housing. Each method is presented and illustrated with a case study to show how it can be used to inform housing policy in a wide range of countries in all parts of the developing world. The methods presented range from intuitive to highly structured, and from those dealing with house and neighborhood level issues to those which analyze city or country-wide issues. Unlike other books in this field, this study concentrates on the methods of analysis rather than the housing policies and programs, and convincingly argues that expediency should not be the only factor to be considered.

Excerpt

For many years, practitioners and students of housing and planning in the developing world have been using methods of analysis developed and written about in contexts other than their own. This book has been put together in the hope that it will help them to relate such methods to housing issues and to discover new methods which they could apply to their local circumstances.

Although each chapter concentrates on the method rather than the case study, no standard format has been imposed so the book cannot be looked upon as an instruction manual. However, it is hoped that enough description of the methods have been included to allow a reader to use them in their own context.

The inclusion of a chapter using a case study in the so-called Republic of Bophuthatswana, should not be taken to indicate any agreement with or acceptance of the apartheid system on the part of any of the contributors, the editors, or the publishers. It is hoped that the case study will assist an equal-opportunity post-apartheid society in South Africa.

The editors wish to thank their colleagues in the Centre for Architectural Research and Development Overseas at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne for their support, and the contributors for their willingness to participate and for their prompt attention to deadlines and modifications. Specific acknowledgements are included in the relevant chapters. Special thanks must go to our wives, Sue Tipple and Pat Willis, for their patience and support, especially as submission day drew near.

A. Graham Tipple

Kenneth G. Willis

Newcastle upon Tyne . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.