The Korean War: No Victors, No Vanquished

The Korean War: No Victors, No Vanquished

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The Korean War: No Victors, No Vanquished

The Korean War: No Victors, No Vanquished

Read

FREE for a limited time

Synopsis

This text analyzes the course of the war, assesses the role of North and South Korea and allied forces, and goes beyond the battlefield to evaluate the contribution of UN naval forces and the impact on the homefront.

Excerpt

An outpouring of books, articles and film in the last decade as well as an impressive memorial on Washington, DC’s Mall have demonstrated that the Korean War (1950-53) is no longer quite “The Forgotten War”, “The Unknown War”, or “The War Before Vietnam”. But this conflict has never assumed the mythic character of, say, the American Civil War or the Second World War. Coming as it did after the clear-cut victory of the Allies over the unarguable evil of the Axis in the Second World War, the localized Korean War, with its status quo armistice, hardly seems an inspiring conflict to study. But it would be practically impossible to understand the Cold War (c. 1946-91) without some knowledge of the Korean War.

As noted, a number of worthwhile studies of the Korean War have appeared in recent years, and several earlier accounts can be justly termed “classics”, particularly the US Army’s official and definitive first volume history of the war. But there remains a need for a single-volume, concise history of the Korean War of modest length (and modest price!), which this work attempts to fulfill. It has been written for the student, researcher or general reader who may not be particularly interested in the exploits of the 999th Field Artillery Battalion or of the 334th Regiment of the Chinese People’s Volunteers, but who wishes to know what brought them to Korea in the first place. Finally, I make no apology for the military emphasis that pervades this work. “The new military history” (unoriginal term that it is) of the last several decades has concentrated on what were admittedly some neglected and significant aspects of warfare, such as women, minorities, economics, technology, the fine arts, and so on. As such, these studies were a welcome addition to the traditional “battle and king” form of military history. But, that said, the course of the Korean War was, hardly surprisingly, more affected by events on the battlefield than by any other factor. The . . .

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