The Three Edwards: War and State in England, 1272-1377

The Three Edwards: War and State in England, 1272-1377

The Three Edwards: War and State in England, 1272-1377

The Three Edwards: War and State in England, 1272-1377

Synopsis

This is a welcome second edition. An excellent introduction to this eventful and fascinating period in history has been updated to include the latest research, pictures and information and it offers students of history and the middle ages a fascinating insight into the reigns of three very different sovereigns:* Edward I - A confident and masterful conqueror of Wales* Edward II - Defeated by the Scots, humiliated and deposed* Edward III - Triumphant against the French, but reigned through the ravages of plague.The book focuses on each king's approach to war - an essential determinant of political and constitutional development, and emphasizes how the importance of war stretches far beyond the traditional boundaries of military history.For any student or researcher of history and the middle ages, this highly acclaimed book provides excellent research and course study opportunities.

Excerpt

The idea for this book was not mine; I owe a considerable debt of gratitude to John Roberts for suggesting to my publishers that I should write it. The opportunity was one which I welcomed, for the period it covers is one on which I had been lecturing at St Andrews for ten years, and which, more seriously, presents intriguing questions as to how the medieval English state in its most developed form responded to the varied problems presented by war. There is a far greater unity to the period when England was ruled by the first three Edwards than might appear from the very different fates and reputations of the kings. This book is intended more as a work of synthesis than as the presentation of original research on a massive scale, though I must acknowledge the generosity of the Research and Travel Funds of the University of St Andrews which enabled me to consult manuscripts and obtain microfilms. Many of my fellow academics may be infuriated by the absence of footnotes: I can only plead the instructions of my publishers, which I welcomed, as had full references been given, the book would have appeared much later in print, at a much higher price. I must apologize, however, to the many scholars on whose work I have relied heavily and whose achievements I have often not been able to acknowledge properly.

I have benefited greatly from reading the unpublished doctoral theses of E. B. Fryde, ‘Edward III’s War Finance, 1337-1341’ (Oxford, 1947), and C. J. Given-Wilson, ‘The Court and Household of Edward III, 1360-77’ (St Andrews, 1977). I have learnt much from my research students while I supervised them; I would like to thank Sharron Uhler and Nancy Messimer. Many St Andrews undergraduates will find parts of this book familiar; I have gained much from teaching them. Ann Kettle and Chris Given-Wilson . . .

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