Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

Securing the U.S. Defense Information Infrastructure: A Proposed Approach

Synopsis

It is widely believed, and increasingly documented, that the United States is vulnerable to various types of information warfare attacks. Threats range from nuisance attacks by hackers to those potentially putting national security at risk. The latter might include attacks on essential U.S. information systems in a major regional crisis or theater war. The purpose might be to deter (or coerce) a U.S. intervention, to degrade U.S. power projection capabilities, to punish the United States or its allies, or to undermine the support of the American public for the conflict.

Excerpt

This report addresses the survivability and assured availability of es/ sential U.S. information infrastructures, especially when they are under various forms of “information warfare” attack. To the best of our knowledge, the term “minimum essential information infrastructure” (MEn) was coined by one of the authors (Mesic) as part of the planning for a series of “Day After… in Cyberspace” information warfare exercises conducted from 1995 to the present under the direction of our rand colleague Roger Molander. the idea is that some information infrastructures are so essential that they should be given special attention, perhaps in the form of special hardening, redundancy, rapid recovery, or other protection or recovery mechanisms.

Players in the “Day After…” exercises were intrigued by the MEn concept but asked: Is this concept feasible? Is it practical? For what portions of the Department of Defense and U.S. infrastructure is the concept relevant? What would such infrastructures look like? How effective or useful would they be? This report documents the findings of the first year of a study of the MEn concept, attempting to formulate some initial answers to these questions-or, if these are not the right questions, to ask and answer better ones. This report should be of interest to persons responsible for assuring the reliability and availability of essential information systems throughout the U.S. defense establishment, the U.S. critical infrastructure, and other organizations. Its findings and recommendations are relevant at all organizational levels, from small units to major commands.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.