Married to the Military: The Employment and Earnings of Military Wives Compared with Those of Civilian Wives

Married to the Military: The Employment and Earnings of Military Wives Compared with Those of Civilian Wives

Married to the Military: The Employment and Earnings of Military Wives Compared with Those of Civilian Wives

Married to the Military: The Employment and Earnings of Military Wives Compared with Those of Civilian Wives

Synopsis

Today's military is a military of families. A high proportion of service members are married and have children, and many of their spouses work and contribute to family income. This book examines whether the wives of military personnel have been able to benefit from the general improvement in opportunities available to women in the workplace, or whether their role as military wives has impeded their potential opportunities. The authors provide an analysis of the various forces affecting military wives' employment and earnings, and hence their ability to contribute to family income and establish their careers. The findings provide a factual basis for the role of military wives as members of military families, and will be of interest to policymakers involved in personnel issues as well as specialists in gender and family studies.

Excerpt

We care about the labor market outcomes of military spouses because the all-volunteer force is a military of families. About one in seven active-duty members enters the military married, and by the eighth year of military service approximately three-quarters of the members are married and many also have children. Military duties, hardships, and risks affect not only the military member, but also the member's entire family. The emergence of the family as a prominent aspect of the all-volunteer force goes hand in hand with the remarkable increase in average duration of service that the volunteers have brought in comparison with a force containing drafted and draft induced personnel. Among enlisted personnel, the group most affected by the draft, about one in eight of an entry cohort completed eight or more years of service, and under the all-volunteer force that percentage has roughly doubled. The volunteer force has become a reality and a success, and it has brought with it a responsibility to the military family.

Today, the information and data available to guide and support analyses of recruiting, retention, personnel quality, and personnel force management are better than ever. Yet for the most part-and certainly with some welcome exceptions-most data and analyses have focused on the military member. Studies of recruiting and retention commonly take the perspective of the member and have little if any information about the employment and earnings opportunities of the spouse and their effect on the decision to join or stay. Also, although there have been studies of quality-of-life aspects such as housing, health care, DoD dependents' schools, and family support programs, these studies primarily concern the coverage . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.