Early Socialisation: Sociability and Attachment

Early Socialisation: Sociability and Attachment

Early Socialisation: Sociability and Attachment

Early Socialisation: Sociability and Attachment

Synopsis

Early Socialisation looks at sociability and attachment and how they relate to emotional and cognitive development. Topics covered include bonding, attachment, deprivation, separation and privation, as well as enrichment. Social and cultural variations are considered, and theories of attachment and loss are described and evaluated.

Excerpt

The focus of this book is on how you came to be who you are. It deals with the way in which early childhood experiences shape a person’s psychological nature. A key part of your personality is your emotional self, and this aspect of self has a critical influence on all other aspects of development. An unhappy child finds it difficult to focus on learning because emotional tension interferes with his/her ability to process information systematically. An insecure child doesn’t want to wander away from the home environment and explore the world. Therefore, one of the first ‘tasks’ for the infant is to find an emotional starting place, a secure base, and to begin his or her emotional development.

The infant’s early social experiences are the means by which it develops emotionally. Infants are generally sociable—they like people and want to interact with them. Some of these social relationships are special. That is to say, people form special bonds with certain others. For example, the infant is likely to form a special bond or attachment

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