Japanese Business Management: Restructuring for Low Growth and Globalization

Japanese Business Management: Restructuring for Low Growth and Globalization

Japanese Business Management: Restructuring for Low Growth and Globalization

Japanese Business Management: Restructuring for Low Growth and Globalization

Synopsis

In this innovative study the views of Japan's leading experts on the globalisation of Japanese business, industrial relations & management explain how Japanese-style management is responding to the changes following the collapse of the bubble economy.

Excerpt

In the ‘post-bubble’ 1990s, Japanese political economy and business management are restructuring for low growth and globalization. Inevitably, a debate has arisen in both Japanese and British academic circles on the significance of these two forces, and their impact on the prevailing perceptions of Japanese management styles. Has Japanese management been spurred into transformation, or merely adjustment?

With this debate in mind, the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of Sheffield decided to convene a seminar for British and Japanese academics and business specialists in order to discuss the implications of recent economic changes brought about by low growth and globalization. the result was the Inaugural Anglo-Japanese Business Seminar, held in the University of Sheffield on 16-18 March 1995, with the support of the Japan Foundation, the Chubu Electric Power Company, Sumitomo Life International, and Japan & Europe Motors (JEMCA).

Most of the chapters making up this volume are revised versions of the seminar papers. the three sections of the seminar are reflected in the division of this book: Part I Japanese business in globalization processes; Part II Restructuring in management; Part iii Restructuring in labour. the primary concern of the organizers was to investigate and consider the most recent aspects of change taking place in Japanese business management as part of the Japanese political economy. the papers show the quality of work being performed on this theme on both sides of the world.

The editors wish to thank Mike Rigby (Sony), Itō Satoshi (DAKS Simpson) and Komori Osamu (Toyota) for their informative presentations on their respective management experiences in the uk. the contributors benefited enormously from the seminar participants and wish to thank, in particular, Raymond Loveridge (Aston), Geoffrey A. Broad (Salford), Lola Okazaki-Ward (Cranfield), John Scott (Exeter), Nick Oliver (Cambridge), John L. Halstead (Sheffield), Royden Harrison (Warwick), and Andrew Tylecote (Sheffield). They not only made invaluable remarks at the seminar, but later kindly provided us with detailed reports which helped the authors to improve the papers edited in this volume. We also wish to thank Hamada Ryūichi and Akeda Yasunobu (Chubu Electric), Tominaga Kenji . . .

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