Straddling Economics and Politics: Cross-Cutting Issues in Asia, the United States, and the Global Economy

Straddling Economics and Politics: Cross-Cutting Issues in Asia, the United States, and the Global Economy

Straddling Economics and Politics: Cross-Cutting Issues in Asia, the United States, and the Global Economy

Straddling Economics and Politics: Cross-Cutting Issues in Asia, the United States, and the Global Economy

Synopsis

This collection of essays examines the case for and against globalization, the effects of U.S. economic and foreign policy, the significance of "moral hazard," and numerous issues related to Asian economics and politics. The essays were originally published in the Wall Street Journal, Asian Wall Street Journal, Wall Street Journal Europe, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, and other prominent journals and media.

Excerpt

The 38 essays in this book were written between the end of 1996 and the middle of 2001, and published in The Wall Street Journal, The Asian Wall Street Journal, The Wall Street Journal Europe, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Weekly Standard, Critical Review, Society, The Milken Review, and International Economy. All the essays appear in their original, unedited form, and none has been altered in light of the world-shaking and world-shaping terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Two of the essays (Chapter 29 and Chapter 35), although written in 2001, weren't published until early in 2002.

Most of the cross-cutting issues dealt with in these essays are as pertinent in the post- as in the pre-9/11 environment. Whether globalization is good or bad and for whom, how to measure it or how to influence it, remain timely questions now as they were then. The admission of China and Taiwan to the World Trade Organization (WTO), and the economic and other consequences of this change in status, will continue to be of regional as well as global significance. So, too, are issues addressed in other chapters, including the case for and against a “new international economic architecture,” the outlook for a strong or a weak euro, the ramifications of China's continued if fitful progress toward capitalism, and the “fairness” and other effects of changes in U.S. marginal tax rates or in government spending as central elements in U.S. fiscal policy.

As indicated by this snapshot of the book's contents, the subject matter covers a wide range of disparate issues, reflecting matters I

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